Month: March 2019

What Are the Symptoms of an Opioid Overdose?
04 mar
What Are the Symptoms of an Opioid Overdose?

These are the most common symptoms of an opioid overdose according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Slow, shallow breathing Gurgling or choking sounds Loss of consciousness or falling asleep Constricted “pinpoint” pupils Cold, pale, or bluish skin Limp body Opioid overdoses cause shallow, interrupted breathing that can quickly lead to brain

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What Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Do Doctors Have to Follow?
04 mar
What Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Do Doctors Have to Follow?

Some states and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offer opioid prescribing guidelines for doctors to follow. There are some opioid prescribing guidelines doctors have to follow, while others are advisory. Opioid Prescribing Rules Vary by State Some state laws attempt to curb opioid addiction by imposing limits on the supply that practitioners

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How Are Opioid Medications Prescribed?
04 mar
How Are Opioid Medications Prescribed?

Opioid medications are prescribed for patients who are experiencing moderate to severe pain. Common opioids, also known as opioid agonists, that doctors may prescribe for pain relief include hydrocodone, oxycodone, morphine, oxymorphone, codeine, and fentanyl. Patients may receive opioid prescriptions when experiencing either acute or chronic pain. Some, but not all, of the factors that

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If an Opioid Overdose Doesn’t Lead to Death, Can I Still File for Medical Malpractice?
04 mar
If an Opioid Overdose Doesn’t Lead to Death, Can I Still File for Medical Malpractice?

Yes, opioid overdoses can be considered medical malpractice even if they do not lead to the victim’s death. Medical Malpractice and Opioid Overdoses Although death is an unfortunately common result of opioid overdoses, this is not a requirement for medical malpractice to have played a role in the incident. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control

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