Inadequate Diagnoses

Inadequate Diagnoses Inadequate diagnoses occur when a doctor makes the wrong diagnosis of a patient's medical condition or makes the correct diagnosis after an unacceptable delay.

Inadequate diagnoses occur when a doctor makes the wrong diagnosis of a patient’s medical condition or makes the correct diagnosis after an unacceptable delay. Either way, the patient does not receive a timely and accurate diagnosis, which may make his or her illness more difficult to treat. A doctor who makes an inadequate diagnosis may be liable for medical malpractice.

Wrongful Diagnosis vs. Delayed Diagnosis

The two main types of inadequate diagnoses are misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis. Both are significant medical errors that can harm patients.

Misdiagnosis or Incorrect Diagnosis

In a misdiagnosis or incorrect diagnosis, the doctor diagnoses the patient with the incorrect condition or fails to make a timely diagnosis. For instance, a patient visits his or her doctor with chest pain. After the doctor performs a few tests, he or she assures the patient it is a minor issue—acid reflux or indigestion.

The patient, relieved, returns home and ignores any further pain. A few days later, the patient is climbing a flight of stairs when his or her chest tightens up. The patient collapses, then awakens in the hospital to learn he or she had a heart attack.

In this situation, the doctor made a wrongful diagnosis, which led to the patient suffering a heart attack that he or she may have been able to avoid with a correct diagnosis and early intervention.

Delayed Diagnosis

In a delayed diagnosis, the doctor makes the correct diagnosis, but only after an unacceptable delay. The challenge in holding a doctor liable for medical malpractice for a delayed diagnosis is proving the doctor had enough information to have made the correct diagnosis earlier.

Inadequate Diagnoses and Medical Malpractice

To hold a doctor liable for medical malpractice based on an inadequate diagnosis, the plaintiff must demonstrate three things:

Free Case Evaluation With a Medical Malpractice Lawyer

Delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis may be considered malpractice. A medical malpractice attorney from Newsome Melton can help. For a free case evaluation, call us today at 855-633-2757.


Inadequate Diagnoses - Frequently Asked Questions

Can Apologies or Sympathies Hurt Your Medical Malpractice Case in Florida?
30 jan
Can Apologies or Sympathies Hurt Your Medical Malpractice Case in Florida?

If a doctor or healthcare provider calls to apologize or express sympathy for an injury suffered by a patient under their care, can this gesture be held against them in a medical malpractice suit? In Florida, the answer is no—as long as the injury occurred as the result of an accident rather than a willful

Read More
23 aug
Can You File A Malpractice Lawsuit For Induced Addiction?

When a doctor chooses to administer a potentially addictive treatment to a patient, he or she has a responsibility to make the patient aware of the possibility, as well as monitor the patient for signs of addiction. Should he or she notice signs of drug abuse, they have an obligation to immediately discontinue the prescription

Read More

Inadequate Diagnoses - News Articles

Pennsylvania Boy Awarded $1.1 Million In Medical Malpractice Lawsuit
01 oct
Pennsylvania Boy Awarded $1.1 Million In Medical Malpractice Lawsuit

A 5-year old Pennsylvania boy was recently awarded $1.1 million in a medical malpractice lawsuit over a surgical procedure that left him with a brain injury. At only 11-months old, Keonte Graham suffered from sleep apnea so badly that his parents took him to Dr. Andrew Shapiro in 2007 for consultation and to find a

Read More
Florida Supreme Court Rules On Secret Ex Parte Interviews
21 nov
Florida Supreme Court Rules On Secret Ex Parte Interviews

Florida Supreme Court Rules Secret Ex Parte Interviews of  Medical Malpractice Plaintiffs’ Doctors Unconstitutional  On November 9, 2017, the Florida Supreme Court issued its highly anticipated decision in Weaver v. Myers, No. SC15-1538 (Nov. 9, 2017).  In Weaver, the Supreme Court struck two provisions pertaining to secret, ex parte interviews with plaintiffs’ healthcare providers in connection

Read More