Inadequate Diagnoses

Inadequate Diagnoses Inadequate diagnoses occur when a doctor makes the wrong diagnosis of a patient's medical condition or makes the correct diagnosis after an unacceptable delay.

Inadequate diagnoses occur when a doctor makes the wrong diagnosis of a patient’s medical condition or makes the correct diagnosis after an unacceptable delay. Either way, the patient does not receive a timely and accurate diagnosis, which may make his or her illness more difficult to treat. A doctor who makes an inadequate diagnosis may be liable for medical malpractice.

Wrongful Diagnosis vs. Delayed Diagnosis

The two main types of inadequate diagnoses are misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis. Both are significant medical errors that can harm patients.

Misdiagnosis or Incorrect Diagnosis

In a misdiagnosis or incorrect diagnosis, the doctor diagnoses the patient with the incorrect condition or fails to make a timely diagnosis. For instance, a patient visits his or her doctor with chest pain. After the doctor performs a few tests, he or she assures the patient it is a minor issue—acid reflux or indigestion.

The patient, relieved, returns home and ignores any further pain. A few days later, the patient is climbing a flight of stairs when his or her chest tightens up. The patient collapses, then awakens in the hospital to learn he or she had a heart attack.

In this situation, the doctor made a wrongful diagnosis, which led to the patient suffering a heart attack that he or she may have been able to avoid with a correct diagnosis and early intervention.

Delayed Diagnosis

In a delayed diagnosis, the doctor makes the correct diagnosis, but only after an unacceptable delay. The challenge in holding a doctor liable for medical malpractice for a delayed diagnosis is proving the doctor had enough information to have made the correct diagnosis earlier.

Inadequate Diagnoses and Medical Malpractice

To hold a doctor liable for medical malpractice based on an inadequate diagnosis, the plaintiff must demonstrate three things:

Free Case Evaluation With a Medical Malpractice Lawyer

Delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis may be considered malpractice. A medical malpractice attorney from Newsome Melton can help. For a free case evaluation, call us today at 855-633-2757.


Inadequate Diagnoses - Frequently Asked Questions

What Are Some Opioid Alternative Treatments?
05 apr
What Are Some Opioid Alternative Treatments?

Chronic pain affects millions of Americans. Until recently, medical professionals would prescribe opioids, such as OxyContin and Vicodin, for pain management. These drugs are incredibly addictive, and opioid abuse and overdose have created a national health crisis. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) suggests these opioid alternative treatments. Please keep in mind that you should

Read More
23 aug
Can Patients Sue For EGD Perforation Injuries?

An upper GI endoscopy, usually called an “EGD” (after “EsophagoGastroDuodenoscopy,” the proper medical name of the procedure), is the visual examination of the upper intestinal tract (esophagus, stomach, and duodenum) using a lighted, flexible, fiber-optic endoscope. Although EGD is considered a relatively safe diagnostic procedure, there have been reported instances of accidental esophageal perforation (puncture)

Read More

Inadequate Diagnoses - News Articles

22 mar
Georgia Doctor Found Liable for Medical Malpractice Leaving Patient Paralyzed

Joan Simmons woke up on July 20, 2014 in unbearable pain. She was somehow able to get herself to the emergency room at St. Joseph’s/Chandler Hospital, located in Savannah, Georgia. Simmons, then 58, told the attending emergency room physicians that she had an intense pain coming from her back. According to court records, Simmons was

Read More
New Mexico Jury Finds Albuquerque Hospital Negligent; Awards Family $7.75 Million
24 jul
New Mexico Jury Finds Albuquerque Hospital Negligent; Awards Family $7.75 Million

New Mexico Jury Finds Albuquerque Hospital Negligent; Awards Family $7.75 Million Michael Webb waited as long as he could. The pain in his knee was not going away. Finally, in December 2011 he decided to have surgery performed. After the procedure, complications forced Webb in to the intensive care unit (ICU) at the Presbyterian Hospital

Read More